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 Where to visit in Botswana


Chobe National Park

The Chobe Game Reserve was established in 1960 and declared a national park in 1967. It is by far the second largest national park in Botswana and covers 10,566 square kilometres has one of the greatest concentrations of game found on the African continent. Its richness of wildlife and the true African nature of the region offer a safari experience of a lifetime. While a number of beautiful creatures such as hippopotamus, buffalo, zebra, lion, hyena, red lechwe, crocodile, sable antelope and impala traverse the golden plains, the Chobe National Park is perhaps most widely known for its enormous population of elephants that is estimated to be 50 000. Take you camera and binoculars come join sightseeing in this park.



Moremi Wildlife Reserve

Machaba Camp is situated in the game rich Khwai area, on the eastern tongue of the Okavango Delta. The name Machaba is the local Setswana name for the Sycamore Fig Tree, the tree of life. In 1962 the local BaTawana people set aside a third of the Okavango Delta to protect it for the future. They called this the Moremi Game Reserve and it covers a large area of the Delta's wetlands and the main dry peninsula that juts into the Delta, known as the Mopane Tongue.

Moremi Wildlife Reserve

Moremi's supreme area is probably Chief's Island, where you'll find several of Botswana's top safari camps. However, there are several prime areas on the edge of the Mopane Tongue, where the land meets the Okavango's permanent waters, which can also be reached with a mobile safari, including the Khwai River (or North Gate) area, Xakanaxa Lagoon and Third Bridge. The whole family can camp in this park; it’s safe as long as you listen to the instructions of the guide.



Makgadikgadi Salt Pan

The Makgadikgadi Pan is a salt pan situated in the middle of the dry savanna of north-eastern Botswana, is one of the largest salt flats in the world. The pan is all that remains of the formerly enormous Lake Makgadikgadi, which once covered an area larger than Switzerland, but dried up several thousand years ago. Here you can find families camping during daylight on their camp chairs and cooler box.

Makgadikgadi Salt Pan

The great Makgadikgadi Pans, covering about 10,000km² of the Kalahari, are nothing but salt. Some are enormous; others are the size of a small duck-pond. Around these are rolling grasslands and the occasional picturesque palm-tree island. On opposite sides of the Makgadikgadi National Park are two contrasting areas: the Central Pans and the Boteti River Area.



Khama Rhino Sanctuary

Whether you camp in one of the well-maintained campgrounds near clean ablution blocks or stay in one of our comfortable well-equipped chalets with en-suite showers and toilets, you are assured of enjoying your stay at Khama Rhino Sanctuary (or as it is also known, the Botswana National Park). If you are a lover of rhinos, here you can be guaranteed to meet them on neither a close range or distant.

Khama Rhino Sanctuary

The camping and chalet facilities at Mokongwa Camp are a short drive from the entrance gate and are accessible without a 4x4 (4wd) vehicle. The chalets are very popular, so it is best to book well in advance. They are perfect for those who prefer self-catering (self-contained) accommodation. The rustic chalets can accommodate four people. Each chalet has a toilet and shower en-suite with hot water. Bedding and towels are also provided. Situated by a Mokongwa tree, you will also find a fireplace, braai stand with grid and a tap and birdbath. Basic cooking equipment and crockery are provided, but no stove or refrigerator.



Moremi Gorge

Explore the ancient natural beauty of Moremi Gorge within the Tswapong Hills of Botswana, where endangered Cape vultures breed on the outcrops above the ancestral waterfalls, in the protected national heritage site of Goo-Moremi Gorge. This baTswana land is full of culture and there is much more to explore.

Moremi Gorge

They offer six thatched chalets and five shaded campsites; all are serviced daily by our friendly staff. The campsites are well marked and sign posted. There are three One-bedroom Chalets and three Two-bedroom Chalets available, powered by solar energy.



Mokolodi Nature Reserve

Mokolodi Nature Reserve is a private not-for-profit game reserve in southern Botswana. Founded in 1994 by The Mokolodi Wildlife Foundation, it is situated on 30 km sq. of donated land 10 km south of the capital Gaborone.

Mokolodi Nature Reserve

The nature reserve is inhabited by a wide variety of indigenous African game, bird and reptile species, some of which are rare and vulnerable to the threat of extinction. The park contains many species of wildlife such as southern white rhino, South African cheetah, mountain reedbuck, South African giraffe, zebra, red hartebeest, sable, gemsbok, African bush elephants, kudu, impala, spotted hyena, African leopard and waterbuck. The park is developed as a game sanctuary with an extensive network of paths, which permits viewing the wild life at close quarters. The park administration is planning to expand its limits of conservation area up to the Lion Park



Kubu Island

Kubu Island is a place of great natural beauty and a Nation Monument. Kubu is a setswana name for a hippopotamus while lekhubu means a rock outcrop.

Kubu Island

This rock outcrop is engulfed by the white sea of salt, making it to remain as an island jutting in the middle of the flats. This is another perfect place for team building, family bonding and just a simple private quiet time alone.



Baines Baobabs

The Nxai Pan National Park has recognized the importance of the Baines Baobabs, and efforts are in place to ensure the protection of these trees in the future. The Baines Baobab trees derive their name from Thomas Baines (who was a member of the Livingstone Expedition); he painted a group of Baobab trees that became famously known as the ‘Baines Baobabs’. According to sources, he completed the painting between 1861 and 1862, and he was overwhelmed with the rare sighting of these fantastic baobab trees.

Baines Baobabs

The Baines Baobabs have changed very little since the original painting by Thomas Baines, except that the popularity for visiting these ‘sleeping sisters’ has grown. The site of the baobabs has been dated back to between 105 000 and 128 000 years. Over the years many other people also had painted these Baobabs, including Prince Charles. The Baobabs have become a popular sight to see and a fascinating Botswana Safari attraction.



Three Chiefs' Statues

The Three Dikgosi Monument is a bronze sculpture located in the Central Business District of Gaborone, Botswana. The statues depict three senior chiefs of the time: Khama III of the Bangwato, Sebele II of the Bakwena, and Bathoen I of the Bangwaketse. The Dikgosi (chiefs) statues will take you back to the rich history of the country and will show you the level of respect of culture of this nation.

Three Chiefs' Statues

The monument of the three chiefs is another impressive historical statue that marks an important turning point in the history of Botswana. In 1895 the territory was under threat from British industrialist Cecil Rhodes who wished place the Bechuanaland Protectorate under the authority of his British South African Company.



Tsodilo Hills

The Tsodilo Hills are a UNESCO World Heritage Site (WHS), consisting of rock art, rock shelters, depressions, and caves. It gained its WHS listing in 2001 because of its unique religious and spiritual significance to local peoples, as well as its unique record of human settlement over many millennia. With one of the highest concentrations of rock art in the world, Tsodilo has been called the ''Louvre of the Desert''.

Tsodilo Hills

Over 4,500 paintings are preserved in an area of only 10 km2 of the Kalahari Desert. The site consists of a few main hills known as the Child Hill, the Female Hill, and the Male Hill. These hills are of great cultural and spiritual significance to the San People of the Kalahari.



Nogatsaa and Tchinga

Naturally beautiful and rich, Nogatsaa and Tchinga in the Chobe National Park are probably the most under-utilised and exciting game areas in the Chobe National Park. Just 70km south of Serondela, comprising a cluster of clay-bottomed pans that hold water well into winter.

Nogatsaa and Tchinga

They are surrounded by a mixture of open grassland, mopane forest and mixed deciduous forests which attract a variety of animal life. This area has not yet been developed.

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